7 x 5 Inches GODDESSES Set of 10 Notecards with Envelopes
7 x 5 Inches GODDESSES Set of 10 Notecards with Envelopes
7 x 5 Inches GODDESSES Set of 10 Notecards with Envelopes
7 x 5 Inches GODDESSES Set of 10 Notecards with Envelopes
7 x 5 Inches GODDESSES Set of 10 Notecards with Envelopes
7 x 5 Inches GODDESSES Set of 10 Notecards with Envelopes
7 x 5 Inches GODDESSES Set of 10 Notecards with Envelopes
7 x 5 Inches GODDESSES Set of 10 Notecards with Envelopes
7 x 5 Inches GODDESSES Set of 10 Notecards with Envelopes
7 x 5 Inches GODDESSES Set of 10 Notecards with Envelopes
7 x 5 Inches GODDESSES Set of 10 Notecards with Envelopes
Museum of Himalayan Arts

7 x 5 Inches GODDESSES Set of 10 Notecards with Envelopes

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Our Notecards with Envelops and descriptions makes an ideal gift for any occasion. 

Tabo Tara

The Tara depicts the style of Buddhist paintings around the 10 AD, and is inspired by the Tara painting as seen at the Tabo monastic complex in the Spiti Valley, situated in the Himalayas of Northern India. Tara is the Ultimate mother, the creator and the saviour; committed to be born again and again until all beings are liberated.

Image: Tabo Style Green Tara
Artist: Master Locho, Dharamsala, 2019
Centre for Living Buddhist Art

Dharamsala Tara

Dharamsala Tara is an homage to the past, a celebration of present, and a contribution to our future. It depicts the style of Buddhist paintings that exists at present in Dharamsala, Northern India, where the peacocks represents the Indian National bird. Tara is the Ultimate mother, the creator and the saviour; committed to be born again and again until all beings are liberated.

Image: Dharamsala Green Tara
Artist: Master Locho and Dr Sarika, Dharamsala, 2020
Centre for Living Buddhist Art

White Tara with Amityus and Ushnishavijaya

Tara, beautifully depicted in the centre, is a motherly figure that paves our way through worldly obstacles. Drawn gracefully along with Amitayus and Ushnishavijaya, it is associated with promoting long life . She has three eyes on her face, the third located at the centre of her forehead; one eye on each of her palms and the sole of her feet. The trinity is considered to be the most popular of the longevity themes in the Buddhist tradition.


Image: White Tara with Amityus and Ushnishavijaya,
Artist: Master Locho, Dharamsala, 2013
Centre for Living Buddhist Art

Sitatapatra

Sitatapatra is the protector Goddess against supernatural danger. She is represented with one thousand heads, hands, and feet. Her feet are protecting and shielding devotees from demons and malicious intent. Every face is detailed uniquely. Every hand and arm contains the open eye of all seeing protection. The deities above Sitatapatra are Shakyamuni Buddha and Ushnisha.

Image: Sitatapatra
Artist: Master Locho, Dharamsala,
Centre for Living Buddhist Art

White Tara with Celestial Landscape

A motherly deity and female bodhisattva, Tara symbolises supreme knowledge, perfect harmony, longevity and purity. She is often, depicted with seven eyes, which symbolise her omniscient vision. Within her headdress, Amitabha Buddha meditates. The landscape imagery and animals depicted include snow lions, deer, fish, ducks, cows, cranes, flowers, lotuses, trees, shrubs, water falls, rivers, snow-covered mountain peaks and green mountains.

Image: White Tara with Celestial Landscape
Artist: Master Locho, Dharamsala, 2015
Photo: Weinberg-Clark Photography, United States
Centre for Living Buddhist Art

White Tara

A motherly deity and female bodhisattva, Tara symbolises supreme knowledge, perfect harmony, longevity and purity. She is often, depicted with seven eyes, which symbolise her omniscient vision. Within her headdress, Amitabha Buddha meditates.

Image: White Tara
Artist: Master Locho, Dharamsala, 2015
Centre for Living Buddhist Art

Gold Green Tara

Tara is the Ultimate mother, the creator and the saviour; committed to be born again and again until all beings are liberated.

Image: Gold Green Tara
Artist: Master Locho, Dharamsala,
Centre for Living Buddhist Art

White Tara

White Tara symbolizes transcendent knowledge, perfect harmony, and longevity. She is a motherly deity for protection and bestows longevity.

She is white in color and is dressed as a Bodhisattva. White Tara is seated in the padmasana pose and is adorned with jewels. She molds the Varadamudra by way of her right hand and holds a lotus with three blossoms in her left. The three blossoms of the lotus flower represent the past, present and future Buddhas, allying White Tara with the spirit of the Buddha. White Tara has seven eyes, one on each palm and foot, and three on her face including one in the forehead symbolizing her omniscient vision.

This thangka is unique because her entire body was painted in silver with gold outlines. At the bottom, there is a conch shell, elephant husks, coral, and earrings of the queen and minister.

Image: White Tara
Artist: Master Locho, Dharamsala,
Centre for Living Buddhist Art

Green Tara Green

Tara is the Ultimate mother, the creator and the saviour; committed to be born again and again until all beings are liberated.

Image: Green Tara Green
Artist: Master Locho, Dharamsala,
Centre for Living Buddhist Art

Saraswati

Saraswati is the Goddess of knowledge, music, arts, wisdom and learning and is revered in both Hindu as well as Buddhist faith.

She holds the musical instrument, Veena symbolic of expressing knowledge that creates harmony. Saraswati is associated with anuraga, the love for and rhythm of music, which represents all emotions and feelings expressed in speech or music.

She is often associated with a swan or a hans, a sacred bird, that symbolizes spiritual perfection, transcendence and moksha. Sometimes she is shown with the peacock depicting colorful splendor and celebration of dance. The peacock as the devourer of snakes is believed to have the alchemical ability to transmute the serpent poison of self into the radiant plumage of enlightenment.

Image: Saraswati
Artist: Dr. Sarika, Dharamsala,
Centre for Living Buddhist Art